Spanish Coastline, 12 Views From The Camino Del Norte

October 31, 2012 — 8 Comments
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Before I resume blogging with photos from the Camino Francés of the Camino de Santiago, and from around British Columbia, Canada, I wanted to look back at my visit this past summer to Spain. On this post, I’ll feature the Spanish coastline with photos that I took while I walked the 860 kilometer Camino Del Norte. Please don’t get me wrong, not all of this Camino features beautiful coastal scenes— much of it is through mountains, rural communities, or along highways. However, I always looked forward to views such as these, even though the walks to them were often very difficult. I hope you enjoy these photos.

One of my favorite scenes, this was east of Llanes, Asturias. I remember a tough walk to this hillside on a very warm afternoon. This beach is the Playa de Ballota (thanks to those who identified it) and looks like a fantastic spot to spend an afternoon.

Spanish Coastline, Llanes, Asturias, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de santiago

 

The ruins of an ancient aqueduct between Pasajes de San Pedro and San Sebastian in the Basque Country on my first day. This walk out of Pasajes de San Pedro was very beautiful and I highly recommend it for those interested in walking the Camino Del Norte.

Ancient Bridge Ruins west of Pasajes de San Pedro, Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Another memorable section, this was my evening hike above Berria Beach west of Santoña. Many pilgrims skip this little hike because of the climb, but it was very beautiful and quite the surprise.

Hike above Berria Beach West of Santona, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

I had never heard of the city of Castro Urdiales before, but it was memorable not only for the seaside views, but for the architecture. I’ll focus on the thirteenth century Church of Santa María de la Asunción in an upcoming blog post.

Castro Urdiales, Seaside boats, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

From my second day, this was the scene near Orio, west of San Sebastian, in the Basque Country.

House, Seaside, East Orio, Camino Del Norte, Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

A few hours later, overlooking the seaside resort city of Zarautz. If you look to the right side of the photo, in a couple of more hours, I would walk around the point of land, left of the island. It always amazed me how far all of us pilgrims walked.

Overlooking Zarautz Camino Del Norte, Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

From my first day, this is the village of Pasajes de San Juan. A ferry takes you across the harbour to another seaside village, Pasajes de San Pedro.

Pasajes de San Juan, Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

From the village of Pobeña, near the western border of Basque Country, this is the Playa de la Arena. Normally, there would be a bridge over the river, but it was out of commission, and required an extra walk of about 2.5 kilometers. This was a long, hot day, and I was so glad to finally arrive to the albergue. My accommodation and stay was very interesting, and not what I had expected. I’ll leave that for my next book.

Playa de la Arena, Pobena, Camino Del Norte, Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

This young horse greeted me on a farm near Orio on my second day. I love her expression.

Horse, Seaside, East Orio, Camino Del Norte, Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 Early morning west of Islares, Cantabria.

Coastline West Islares, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Approaching Caborredondo, west of the medieval city of Santillana del Mar. I had never heard of Santillana del Mar prior to my visit and was pleasantly surprised how much of it was preserved. I was also surprised how many tourists there were. I was lucky to find a place to sleep.

Seaside, Caborredondo, Santillana del Mar, Camino del Norte, Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Back to my first day, this is another view west of Pasajes de San Pedro, Basque Country.

Coastline west of Pasajes de San Pedro, Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain, Camino de Santiago, Camino de Santiago

I hope you enjoyed this post as I looked back at my journey on the Camino Del Norte. For larger size photos, please visit my Facebook page. Please also check out this blog for posts from the Camino Francés. I look forward to sharing more photos and insight into these great journeys.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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8 responses to Spanish Coastline, 12 Views From The Camino Del Norte

  1. The pictures are beautiful. The trail –green grass-blue sky –so lovely —(peaceful feeling)….
    The Village is charming— (very inviting)–as in wanting to sit and chat with others over a nice cup of tea.

    Forever memories you must have from many miles of walking you took. Pretty amazing!

    Thanks for sharing.
    elyse

  2. Thanks so much. You are right, the seaside villages in Spain were very charming. Although I did have physical issues and battled tiredness on the Camino Del Norte, I look back at my walk with great fondness. I have completed two Caminos now and look forward to my next one. In the meantime I will keep posting here and hopefully inspire those who are able to walk at least part of the Camino one day.

  3. These places are where some of my ancestors lived before immigrating to the US. My roots are both northern and southern European: Portuguese, Spanish, Irish and British.The photos are breath taking. I feel inspired to pay a visit one summer – and bring a good camera!!

    • Thanks, Kathlyn. I really appreciate your compliment. It was not that difficult to take photos with scenes such as these. I hope you get to visit one day soon. I’m sure you could spend a few weeks just touring and relaxing along the northern Spanish coast.

  4. Your photos are amazing. I’ve probably told you before — I walked the Camino from Leon to Santiago. Went through charming villages and beautiful rolling hills, but we didn’t see the ocean. I’d love to go again.

    • Thanks Sandra. Yes, I remember that you walked that stretch of the Camino. The Camino del Norte is a much different route. Beautiful in its own way with the coastal and beach scenes, but also much more challenging with numerous ups and downs. I hope you return soon. Buen Camino 🙂

  5. Carole Coutaz-Repland March 9, 2013 at 12:57 am

    In summer 2012 from Irun I walked on Camino del Norte, fantastic Way, to Oviedo. Then I am gone to Santiago on Primitivo, other way of serenity, meditation… charismatic Way. I came back in France to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port on Camino Francès. Very interresting to see how pilgrims are walking in the other direction or in the good direction as you like! I had some difficulties during these two months and 2 weeks but so much felicity: exchanges, sharing,prayers, beauty of the country….I wish to everyone to have the same happiness!

    • Well said, Carole. As pilgrims, we must persevere through any challenges. I’m glad you had a rewarding journey. You are so right, a wish for everyone to enjoy the Camino and find happiness. Thanks for stopping by 🙂

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