The most surprising aspect about visiting the last home of Leonardo da Vinci, Château du Clos Lucé, at Amboise in the Loire Valley of central France, may not be the château itself, but the amazing, and very scenic park, Parc Leonardo Da Vinci. At times, it was peaceful and serene as I enjoyed an evening walk on a beautiful summer’s day. I didn’t know about the vastness of the park, and how well-presented and fun it would be. Not only can you walk the paths, enjoy the greenness and flowers, you can try and participate in the inventions of the great Leonardo.

On my last post, Finding Leonardo Da Vinci, My Visit to Château du Clos Lucé, I took you in and around Château du Clos itself. Now, let’s go for a walk around Parc Leonardo da Vinci. First, let’s look back at the Château itself. I really like this view.

1 park Château du Clos Lucé Amboise France An Afternoon at Parc Leonardo da Vinci, Château du Clos Lucé

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Before I left home for the Camino de Santiago, I chose a small stone from a beach in Vancouver, Canada. I carried the stone to England, France, and across Spain to Finisterre, Galicia. On the famed beach, Praia do Mar de Fora, I gently tossed the stone from the Pacific Ocean into the Atlantic. Then, I picked up a small stone from that very spot on Praia do Mar de Fora and carried it home. I tossed it into the Pacific off the same beach where picked up the first one. All this was to honor my recently departed mother who would have been thrilled to know that I walked across Spain on the Camino de Santiago.

I left my last post, Visiting The End of the World at Cabo Fisterra, Monte Facho, with this view of the famed western beach, Praia do Mar de Fora from the summit of Monte Facho. This was a beautiful spot to sit, relax, and take in the vistas. If you have time, I really recommend making the short climb up Monte Facho. It’s well-worth the effort!

Praia do Mar de Fora Finisterre fisterra Spain Visiting Cabo Fisterra, Monte Facho and Praia do Mar de Fora

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In ancient times, the Romans built a road to the summit of Monte Facho and it’s believed that a settlement once stood on the mountain. Ruins and artifacts from throughout the centuries have been found on Monte Facho. For some pilgrims, locals, and notables, the mountain has become a final resting spot; a finality of the journey of life. For others, it’s a place of birth, at least of conception. It may be (or may not be) interesting to note that there’s one specific and famous stone on Monte Facho that sterile couples from centuries ago (and quite possibly, recently too), following a Celtic rite of fertility, would have sexual intercourse to hopefully conceive. I only saw one couple on my entire trek to Monte Facho and they were fully clothed. As for me, I was alone and, at the time, had no idea about the famous stone or its location.

I left my last post, The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Visiting The End of the World, here, at the statue that pays tribute to the dolphin and their importance to the waters off Cabo Fisterra. Let’s continue. We have a small mountain to climb.

dolphin cape Finisterre fisterra Camino Galicia Visiting The End of the World at Cabo Fisterra, Monte Facho

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The famed lighthouse at the end of the world, Faro de Fisterra, is one of the most recognized landmarks in all of Galicia. The lighthouse was built in 1853, and on a clear day, can be seen from 30 kilometres out at sea. The northwest coastline of Galicia is rough, jagged, and treacherous. Therefore, it was given the appropriate name, Costa da Morte, the Coast of Death. Numerous vessels from ancient times to the present are resting on the floor of the Atlantic with lives lost multiplied many times more. It’s not only pleasure and fishing boats that have had distress, but well-documented naval battles between the French and English occurred just off Cabo Fisterra. Visitors are also reminded to be careful walking on the slippery rocks as deaths on the coastline around the lighthouse have also occurred.

I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Finisterre to The End of the World, here at the 0.00 kilometer bollard at the end of the world. As a pilgrim, you arrive here full of emotion, and grateful that this part of your journey is over, and you’re safe and sound. Once you begin walking the Camino though, the pilgrim knows his or her journey never ends. I know mine continues. Now, let’s take a look around the end of the world at Cape Finisterre.

0 kilometer bollard Finisterre fisterra Camino Galicia The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Visiting The End of the World

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The ancient fishing community of Finisterre is rich in history, and not only a land of importance for the Camino de Santiago, it’s an inspiration for those seeking their own magic. Cape Finisterre, (Cabo Fisterra), has long been the site of spirituality, reflection, battles, and tragedies at sea. Centuries ago, when the world was still considered flat, many journeys ended at Cabo Fisterra, where the sun disappears over the horizon of the Atlantic Ocean. Finisterre means “lands end” in Latin, and on our journey today, we shall go to the end of the world.

I left my last post, On and Off The Camino Finisterre in Finisterre, Spain, overlooking the Praia de San Roque from my hotel room. Let’s continue our journey at the castle, Castelo de San Carlos.

Castelo San Carlos Finisterre fisterra Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Finisterre to The End of the World

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 Fishing has been important to the economy of Finisterre since ancient times. The Finisterre harbour has one of the busiest ports in Galicia. When you’re here, make sure you visit the fish market where the local fishermen (and ladies) display and sell their catches. The area of Finisterre near the port is vibrant with shops and restaurants overlooking the harbour. You may wish to sit on a patio and try the local seafood delicacy, the shell fish, percebes, which is a barnacle. Another must for your palate is pulpo a la gallega, the renowned Galician octopus dish. If you’re not hungry, you can just relax with a glass of albariño, the Galician white wine. We’re a little ahead of ourselves now. We’ll get to downtown Finisterre really soon.

I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Cee to Finisterre, after a scenic walk of about two kilometers along the beach, Praia da Langosteira, as we made our way to Cabo Fisterra, Cape Finisterre. Ahead is the smaller Praia de San Roque. Let’s take a better look from the other side…

beach Finisterre fisterra Camino Galicia On and Off The Camino Finisterre in Finisterre, Spain

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