Cee was unlike any place I had seen for over three weeks—a coastal town. I was excited as I walked through but wondered where everyone was. It was early afternoon and the downtown was very quiet. After the downtown area, I realized most people, although still not that many, were at the market and shopping mall. A pleasant place, but I wonder how many pilgrims spend much time in Cee, with Finisterre only 10 kilometers away.

I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Dumbria to Cee, facing the quiet downtown. Let’s continue. I understand there’s a beach that’s close by.

downtown cee Camino Finisterre Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Cee to Finisterre

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I was excited when I first saw the Atlantic Ocean and the northwest coastline of Galicia. No, I wasn’t in Finisterre yet, but in the hills between the option near Dumbria and the town of Cee. I couldn’t wait to touch the water as it had been over three weeks since I had last seen and touched the Atlantic at the beach in Biarritz, France. I was also happy that I had my last major climb of my journey on the Camino de Santiago as I was getting tired from walking. There were a few ups and downs ahead but nothing like I had experienced. Okay, I’m a little ahead of myself now. Let’s continue…

I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Olveiroa to Dumbria, at the option near Dumbria. The route to the left takes you to Finisterre whereas the route to the right takes you first to Muxía.

option logoso Camino Finisterre Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Dumbria to Cee

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Although the title of this post states that I started in Olveiroa, I really wasn’t there yet. I was somewhere on Monte Aro and still had about an hour left to walk. I remember a quiet afternoon as I saw few pilgrims. I didn’t rush, knowing that I would be arriving soon to Olveiroa, my place to stay for the night. I had a concern though about the small albergue and didn’t want to arrive too late. It would be a long walk until the next one and after spending long days on the Camino Francés, I just wanted to arrive early, relax, visit with other pilgrims, and write my book.

Let’s continue as we have to descend Monte Aro. I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Cornado to Olveiroa, facing peaceful farmland with the reservoir, Embalse de Ferrenza, behind.

cattle embalse ferrenza olveiroa Camino Finisterre Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Olveiroa to Dumbria

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Probably my greatest memory from this stretch of the Camino Finisterre was passing a stage where a pop band was rehearsing for the next day’s concert. The female singer called out to me as I walked by with a loud, amplified, “Buen Camino!” I turned around to show the band my Canadian flag proudly placed on my backpack, and yelled a non amplified ”Buen Camino” back to them. She said something in Spanish that I sadly couldn’t understand, but the moment definitely made me smile. It was also good to have a little interaction because there weren’t many other pilgrims around.

On my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Negreira to Cornado, I left Negreira before sunrise and felt energized after a short first day on the Camino Finisterre. The communities in the hills between Negreira and Olveiroa were small and the walking was very pleasant, unless you consider climbing hills unpleasant. I suppose I did later as the climb over Monte Oro made me tired in the afternoon sun. Wait! I’m getting ahead of myself, let’s continue in the community of Cornado.

bollard cornado Camino Finisterre Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Cornado to Olveiroa

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Because I arrived late most evenings to my place of stay on the Camino Francés, I often had trouble getting my body moving in the morning. Sometimes, I didn’t leave until 10 AM. That wasn’t the case on the second morning of my Camino Finisterre. I had arrived to Negreira in the early afternoon and relaxed while visiting with other pilgrims and writing a very early draft of my book. It was good to relax for a change, but I was really ready for an early start the next morning. As I mentioned on my last post, that was exasperated by another pilgrim turning on the lights of the large room in the albergue at 5 AM. Coupled by their loud talking, I couldn’t help getting up early.

I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Ponte Maceira to Negreira, on the other side of the palace, Pazo de Cotón. The Capela de San Mauro is on the left.

Pazo de Cotón Palace negreira Camino Finisterre Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Negreira to Cornado

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Well, I had just visited one of my favorite sites along the Camino de Santiago, the village of Ponte Maceira with the ancient bridge over the Río Tambre. If you’re walking, give yourself some time to relax here. There is a café or you can sit at the edge of the river with views of the waterfall upstream. Maybe, you desire a little more tranquility and want to watch the river flow slower on the downstream side as it travels on its own journey toward the Atlantic. Whichever side you choose, you will have a great view of the amazing bridge, certainly a site to remember.

On my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Ponte Maceira, Spain, we walked slowly across the bridge to here. Now, let’s have one last look at the peaceful scene.

rio tambre ponte maceira 14 Camino Finisterre Galicia On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Ponte Maceira to Negreira

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