On the Camino de Santiago in Spain, Pamplona to Uterga

January 6, 2012 — 10 Comments
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I stopped at a memorial for a pilgrim, and even though I had already seen a few, this one was unique. The cross was handmade out of iron, with a yellow Camino scallop shell on the top. Under the man’s name, in the center, was a photo of him with a backpack. At the base, sat a recently-placed bouquet of artificial roses, which looked real. The man looked so happy, and I felt sure he had passed away doing something he enjoyed. From Page 45, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days. Moments such as these were always touching. Nobody came to the Camino expecting to die.

Now, I’ll continue with my journey on the Camino de Santiago, in the chapter, Day 2: The Bed Shook Like an Earthquake Rolling Through the Hills of Navarra. Even if you don’t have my book, you can still enjoy this post, and learn more about walking the French Way or Camino Francés (map from Wikipedia Commons). I left my last post, On the Camino de Santiago: Pamplona, Spain, on the grounds of the University of Navarra. It was late in the afternoon on a very warm spring day.

The bridge over the Río Sadar quickly led to a rural area after crossing the freeway.

Image of Stone Brige over Río Sadar, University of Navarra grounds, Pamplona, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

The small suburb of Cizur Menor was on top of the hill in the center.

Image of the road to Cizur Menor outside Pamplona, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

A farmer’s field meets industrial land on the edge of Pamplona.

Image green Farmland, Industrial area, Pamplona, Spain, blue sky

 

This sign in Cizur Menor gets the message across, no matter the language.

Image of Pick up Dog Poo Sign, Cizur Menor, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

Leaving Cizur Menor. Cyclists show the way of the path.

Image of Hayfield or wheat field, outside Cizur Menor, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

The hamlet of Galar sits on top of the hill.

Image of Galar, outside Cizur Menor, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

On page 81 in their excellent book, The Pilgrimage Road To Santiago, Gitlitz & Davidson, mention a cluster of ruins called Guendulain. I believe this is what they referred to.

Image of the ruins of a castle or monastery near Galar, Spain Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

This lonely Camino path was typical of most of my late afternoons and evenings. The Alto del Perdón and windmills are along the ridge in the distance.

Image of Alto del Perdón and Windmills in the distance Spain Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

Near the hamlet of Zariquiegui, was this aforementioned memorial for a fallen pilgrim.

Image of a Memorial near Zariquiegui, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

Nearby, in a fenced graveyard, a tree had died.

Image of a Graveyard and tree near Zariquiegui, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

Looking back at Pamplona in the distance.

Image looking back at Pamplona, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

 Approaching Zariquiegui.

Image of

 

The 13th century Church of San Andrés in Zariquiegui.

Image of Church in Zariquiegui, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

I admired this small patio with stone and flowers.

Image of Home patio in Zariquiegui, Spain, Camino de Santiago, The French Way

 

The Camino leaving Zariquiegui. The path dropped, and then climbed to the ridge and the Alto del Perdón. The yellow mustard flowers would become prominent over the next few days.

Image of Alto del Perdón and Windmills, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

Farmland meets the scrubby hills just below the Alto del Perdón.

Image of Farmland and scrubby hills, Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

Here’s me on the rough trail.

Image of Randall St. Germain on the rocky path near Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

Ruins of a home, just below the Alto del Perdón. The town of Astraín is in the distance.

Image of Astraín in the distance near Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

 Pilgrim Monument at the Alto del Perdón.

Image of the iron Pilgrim monument, Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

Image of

 

The wind turbines towered above.

Image of Windmills, Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

This fountain was typical of some along the Camino. It looked ancient but wasn’t that old. I certainly wouldn’t drink from this one. I advise everyone to always carry enough water, and don’t depend on fountains that may or may not be ahead, or have questionable drinking water. 

Image of an Old fountain at Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

Uterga from the Alto del Perdón, with an approaching storm.

Image of Uterga from Alto del Perdón, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

The trail from the Alto del Perdón was, at times, steep and rocky. Once at the bottom of the hill, the path to Uterga was very pleasant.

Image of the pleasant path between Alto del Perdón and Uterga, Camino de Santiago, Spain, The French Way

 

An old marker or waymark in Uterga.

Image of Uterga, Spain Camino de Santiago, The French Way

I hope you enjoyed this post. There were more photos than I had expected to include, but I fondly remember the walk from Pamplona to the Alto del Perdón. On my next post, On The Camino de Santiago in Spain, Uterga to Puente la Reina, I left Uterga on a rainy morning toward the magnificent bridge of Puente la Reina. Please join me.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle. My Goodreads page has reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.

About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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10 responses to On the Camino de Santiago in Spain, Pamplona to Uterga

  1. miriam from canada February 27, 2012 at 4:53 am

    Lovely photographs, brings back lots of memories.

    • Thanks for your comment. Blogging and posting photos is bringing back memories for me also. I can appreciate my journey even more.

  2. Fuel for the fire! Love your stories – can’t wait to create my own!

  3. I am very much enjoying your blogspot – however, at around Leon, something very odd starts happening with your posts – they jitter and I can’t ‘hit’ any of the links. I leave Alberta Canada on May 30 and will take my first step on The Camino (Pamplona to Santiago) on June 1, 2013. Your photos have made an eagerly anticipated trip/trek even harder to wait for.

    • Lee Anne, I checked the links and they seem fine from my side. My earlier posts had large-sized photos, which may take long to load. I have smaller sized photos since I relaunched my blog back in October. I hope to be in Santiago on my blog by the time you leave. Wishing you a safe and rewarding journey. Buen Camino 🙂

  4. Hi!
    Me and my huseband are planing a walk from Pamplona this Easter. We are wondering how the weather may be? What is the tampareture in April? We come from Norway and we have never done anything like this before.
    Best regards Synøve

  5. If you follow my blog here, you can get an idea what the weather may be like but it really depends on the year. I started walking in late April and experienced a lot of wet and cold. Other years, at the same time, it could be warm, even hot. I wish you a pleasant journey. All the best and Buen Camino 🙂

  6. Chuck Shively June 17, 2014 at 8:40 am

    Randall, I’m enjoying reliving my recently concluded trip on your website! I also left in later Apr. (the 24th)from St Jean PDP and finished on May 23. I only had 4 days walking in rain and even then it was not close to constant. Several other days it rained in the late afternoon or over night but the weather, overall, couldn’t have been much better for walking, talking, and nature watching. There is a good reason spring in NW Spain is so green! Thanks, Chuck

    • Chuck, I think you had the opposite weather as I had. After this 2nd day ending in Utegra, I had rain and/or cold for the next 2 weeks. Fortunately, I had some nice evenings for walking. I can’t complain about my Camino dl Norte, except maybe it was too hot! Sounds like you had a fantastic trip. All the best and Buen Camino! 🙂

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