On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, El Acebo To Molinaseca

November 19, 2012 — 4 Comments
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I wished I had seen El Acebo in finer weather. The village had a rustic charm, with its stone houses and slate roofs. The hospitalero explained how El Acebo, similar to the previous villages, once had many homes in ruins. In recent years, as tourism and popularity of the Camino increased, it had brought in money, and people returned to live… From Page 150, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days.

Now, I’ll continue with my journey on the Camino de Santiago. If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, I’m in the chapter, Day 15: Wild Spanish Lavender. Even if you don’t have my book, you can still enjoy this post, and learn more about walking the French Way or Camino Francés (map from Wikipedia Commons). I left my last post, On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Manjarín to El Acebo, as I arrived into El Acebo, after completing a tough day with cold, rain, snow, and wet and muddy trails. I had hoped for a better day than the previous one, but the morning started off with more cold, rain, and fog. I stopped for a moment and admired this doorway, decorated with scallop shells.

Scallop shells, El Acebo, Spain, Camino Frances

 

I was the last pilgrim to leave the albergue, and most likely the village; walking through deserted streets again.

Streets and Church, El Acebo, Spain, Camino Frances

 

A monument for a pilgrim cyclist, who passed away here in 1987, stood in front of the small church on the outskirts of El Acebo.

Ermita & Pilgrim Memorial, El Acebo, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 Walking through the fog with intermittent rain. I looked forward to getting off the mountain.

Fog leaving El Acebo, Spain, Camino Frances

 

The main street of Riego de Ambros was also very quiet.

Entering Riego de Ambros, Spain, Camino Frances

 

The 16th century church in Riego de Ambros.

Church in Riego de Ambros, Spain, Camino Frances

 

I was really, really tired of walking through the mud. At least my boots were almost dry from the previous day’s wet adventure. At the albergue, I had placed my boots near the furnace for the night and it sure helped.

Path west, Riego de Ambros, Spain, Camino Frances

 

I wrote on page 151, “A favorite of mine in the gardens back home, I had never expected to see Spanish lavender in Spain – although the name should have suggested that it was a real possibility…” The skies lightened after the rain stopped. A few rays of sunshine appeared and brought out the brilliant colours.

Spanish Lavender Broom west of Riego de Ambros, Spain, Camino Frances

 

The white broom was also striking and covered complete hillsides.

White Broom west of Riego de Ambros, Spain, Camino Frances

 

The descent to the town of Molinaseca was on trails that were steep at times. This stretch of the Camino had trails that resembled ones that I would find in the mountains near my home in Vancouver, Canada.

 

Path east of Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

 

A pretty spot overlooking what I believe was an old homestead.

White broom east,Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

 

  I really enjoyed this hike though the mountain valley toward Molinaseca.

Mountains, east, Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 

Hills, east, Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

 

Molinaseca is in the distance.

In the distance, Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

 

I had met a group of students from Utah in the United States, and one took my photo. This was typical of my attire during much of my first two weeks on the Camino.

Randall St. Germain, author, east, Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

 

The windy highway down to Molinaseca, which I’m sure was dangerous for pilgrims who choose to skip the trail.

Winding Highway, east, Molinaseca, Spain, Camino Frances

I hope you enjoyed this post, as the morning walk turned out to be far nicer than the previous day. On my next post, Valley Of Broom And Spanish Lavender, Camino De Santiago, I’ll feature the flowers in the mountains between El Acebo and Molinaseca. Please join me.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle. My Goodreads page has reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.

About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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4 responses to On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, El Acebo To Molinaseca

  1. I thoroughly enjoyed your blogs incl. wonderful photography. I’m glad you didn’t walk into that electric fence. I think I must buy your book and learn more. Do you have another book in the works?

    Best,
    Marie

  2. Thanks Marie. I think that was the fastest comment ever here. I haven’t started writing another book. I want to get my present book better known first. Yes, reading Camino de Santiago In 20 Days is an excellent idea, although my opinion is biased 🙂

  3. Hi Randall, Lovely pictures and commentary. I am from North Vancouver, walked the Camino Frances in May 2012 and plan to go back this year, I think in September. I’d like to read your book. Where can I find it?
    Best regards,
    Joanne

    • Joanne, thanks for the kind words. My book is available at Amazon in paperback or kindle and at the Kobo store. In Vancouver, Banyan Books had copies and if you wish, you can order one directly from me: randall@caminomyway.com. Thanks for visiting my blog and Buen Camino! 🙂

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