On The Camino De Santiago In Manjarín Spain

November 8, 2012 — 4 Comments
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Although I was wet and tired, I took my time in Manjarín. Each house, no matter the state, had a sense of character. Some houses sent shivers up my spine, and I wondered what had happened to the people who were once there. Did they abandon the village, or did the village die with them? From page 146, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days.

Now, I’ll continue with my journey on the Camino de Santiago. If you have my book, I’m in the chapter, Day 14: Who Else Would I Dream About? Even if you don’t have my book, you can still enjoy this post, and learn more about walking the French Way or Camino Francés (map from Wikipedia Commons). I left my last post, On The Camino de Santiago In Spain, Foncebadón To Manjarín, walking on wet and muddy trails. Rain, mixed with big, wet flakes of snow, was falling all around. I also had wet boots for the first time on the Camino and wasn’t happy. I didn’t know anything about Manjarín before I had arrived. To say I was shocked is an understatement. I had never before seen anything as haunting as the village of Manjarín.

The cemetery on the outskirts of the village.

Graveyard, east of Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

  The approach to Manjarín.

Approaching Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

I believe someone was living in this house. It was one of the very few that were still standing.

First Home, Manjarín, Spain, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

The village originated in the 12th century.

Cross and Ruins, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

The highway was deserted on this gloomy afternoon.

Village in Ruins, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

I stopped in front of many ruins, and wondered about the people who were once there.

Home in Ruins, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

Home in Ruins in Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

There was something ahead…

Home in Ruins, highway, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

Although I didn’t see anybody, there was definitely signs of life at the albergue. I wrote on page 146, “Outside, a sign showed distances to various places, including 222 kilometers to Santiago. If I survived my time on the mountain, I would be past the three-quarter mark sometime during the next day.”

Albergue, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

Across from the albergue, this letrina or toilet would have been a welcome sight on the senda, a few days earlier.

Letrina, Toilet, Albergue, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

Highway from Albergue, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

On page 146, I wrote about these stone slabs. I had no idea what they were.

Stone Slabs, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

Stone Slabs Closeup, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

This home possibly had occupants until recently. By recently, I mean within the last 50 years.

Home Closeup, Manjarín, Spain, The French Way, Camino Frances

 

Looking back at Manjarín. I don’t know if I will ever see anything like it again. It must be spooky to walk through at night, especially during a storm.

 

 

Looking back, Manjarín, The French Way, Camino Frances

I hope you enjoy this post. Manjarín doesn’t get much more than a mention in most guidebooks, but at least for this pilgrim, walking through the village was an experience I’ll never forget. On my next post, On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Manjarín to El Acebo, I walked off the highway, and along the worst, and potentially dangerous, trails on the Camino. Please join me.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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4 responses to On The Camino De Santiago In Manjarín Spain

  1. Dr Sadia Rashid June 27, 2013 at 8:49 pm

    I love the depth and style of your great writing..I have always tried to find a writer who would be able to take me along…I see that great descriptive depth in your writing…I can imagine and feel it all…I want to read your book as well…bless u

    • Thanks you very much for visiting my blog. I appreciate your kind words. That is what I want to do is to take you along with me. I hope you can read my book soon and enjoy it. Have a good laugh too 🙂

  2. Patty McIntyre Carpio Manjarin November 7, 2013 at 9:45 am

    Thank you for your observations and pictures. My grandfather’s family is from Manjarin. They left for Argentina when he was a young boy. I was second generation born in Argentina but came to the United States at the age of 2 and grew up here. I am still very close to all my family in Argentina and our emotional ties to our Spaniard ancestry are exceptionally strong. My cousins and I often speak of a pilgrimage back to Spain, Asturias… Leon… And yes, especially the town of Manjarin, our Namesake. Your comments make me wonder what that would actually be like in person. I hope someday to be able do know the answer first hand. Thank you again

    • Hi Patty. Thanks for talking about your background. You must visit Manjarin and spend some time there. I know it would mean a lot to you. I didn’t have any roots there and it still sent shivers up my spine. I wrote in my book, “…I wondered what had happened to the people who were once there…”
      Thanks for stopping by and Buen Camino 🙂

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