Flowers and Meadows of Mount Outram

June 8, 2012 — 10 Comments
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There is nothing like completing a challenging hike, and Mount Outram, in Southern British Columbia, Canada, is definitely one of them. With an elevation gain of 1,800 meters, or 5,900 feet, over 9 kilometers, or 5.6 miles, it can certainly be grueling. However, for those less inclined to climb to the summit, arguably the main feature of Mount Outram is not the view from the top—although it’s spectacular—but the beautiful meadows, with some of the best shows of mountain flowers that you will ever see.

Mount Outram is located in the Cascade Mountains, and was named for Sir James Outram, a mountaineer and a British clergymen. Sir Outram made first ascents of many mountains in the Canadian Rockies, including Assiniboine, Bryce, and Columbia. In 1905, he published a book, In the Heart of the Canadian Rockies, which tells about his adventures during the early days of mountaineering in the area. In fact, the Canadian Rockies also have a mountain named for Sir James Outram.

On my post, Ground Squirrels and a Bear, I described some of the history of Manning Provincial Park. For this hike, the trailhead and early section are in the park, but most of the area, including the meadows and summit, are not. The trailhead is located at the west gate, about 200 kilometers east of Vancouver. The drive takes about 2 1/2 hours. If you’re travelling from Vancouver and plan to hike to the summit, be prepared for a long day.

The west gate of Manning Provincial Park.

 

After a long climb through the trees, the trail leads to the lower meadows of Mount Outram.

 

Only in the lower meadows exists one my favorite flowers: the Tiger Lily or Columbia Lily.

 

 

From last summer, the lower meadows had an abundance of yellow and purple daisies or asters.

 

This was a little higher up during a previous year. What a beautiful show!

 

Looking toward the mountains of Manning Provincial Park.

 

Phlox in the rock garden.

 

Yes, a natural rock garden. The phlox is in full bloom here.

 

 

Another favorite, the Indian paintbrush.

 

The ridge and meadows to the east of Outram.

 

Heather at its peak show during a good year.

 

The Western Pasque Flower or Western Anenome during one visit, early in the season, and…

 

the feathery seed pods, taken a little later in the season, during another year. Yes, it’s the same flower.

 

Penstemon and paintbrush taken a little higher up; again looking toward Manning Park.

 

Mount Outram gets more noticeable, and daunting, the higher you climb.

 

This is the upper meadows at its best show.

 

Nearing the end of the upper meadows of Outram. A steep hike up scree or talus is ahead for those who are not yet tired. Views From Mount Outram will be a future blog post.

 

Once again, the beautiful upper meadows.

 

  Truly, a place that is very special to me.

I hope you enjoyed this post, as I continue to showcase areas of British Columbia, close to my home. I will surely venture out more this summer. Not sure where… I hope you will join me.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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10 responses to Flowers and Meadows of Mount Outram

  1. Absolutely beautiful. Your sense of sight and smell must have overdosed! A potent tonic for this lady who has loved wild flowers since childhood. Thank you for giving me a glimpse. Your photography is outstanding.

    • Thank you very much. Hiking to Outram Meadows is well worth the effort, and as I wrote, are very special place for me. Some of those photos, almost looked like a painting themselves. I’m glad you enjoyed them.

  2. These Photos Are Pure Loveliness!! Thank-You-For-Sharing!! Take-Care~Nicky~

  3. elyse walters June 11, 2012 at 1:46 pm

    Awesome & Amazing!

    WOW…..can a mountain of flowers get any more beautiful?

    Sound of Music? —MOVE OVER!!!

    • Thanks so much. Yes, the meadows are a big WOW. I was awestruck the first time I visited them. For many, they are the destination.

  4. Lovely scenery. You are indeed very blessed to stay in that part of the world. Do post more pictures.

  5. ” Earth laughs in flowers”
    Such wonderful ,beautiful pictures..
    Such a lovely place to be in , and thanks so much for sharing such pleasant and joyful scenes!

    • Vijaya, thanks so much for the beautiful quote. I’m glad you enjoy the photos. There will be another post from the Meadows of Mount Outram very soon 🙂

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