On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Cee to Finisterre

July 3, 2013 — 2 Comments
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Cee was unlike any place I had seen for over three weeks—a coastal town. I was excited as I walked through but wondered where everyone was. It was early afternoon and the downtown was very quiet. After the downtown area, I realized most people, although still not that many, were at the market and shopping mall. A pleasant place, but I wonder how many pilgrims spend much time in Cee, with Finisterre only 10 kilometers away.

I left my last post, On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Dumbria to Cee, facing the quiet downtown. Let’s continue. I understand there’s a beach that’s close by.

downtown cee Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

Along the seawall, Cee had these colorful pillars. This one depicted a pilgrim. Let’s took a look on the other side…

art cee Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

Ahhh… a beach and the Atlantic Ocean. I was back at sea level. This is looking toward Cee. I took the route along the beach to the adjacent town of Corcubión. If you’re walking, most of the hostels, bars, and stores are in Cee.

beach cee Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

 Another look at the beach that had been nicely raked that morning. I couldn’t understand why the beach was deserted. It seemed odd on such a spectacular day.

beach cee Corcubión Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

This estuary is the Ría de Corcubión which includes the large cove from southwest of here, all the way to the tip of Cape Finisterre.

Atlantic cee Corcubión Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

The Camino climbs steeply from Corcubión and here, I’m looking back at the town in the foreground. On the other side is an industrial section of Cee.

coast cee Corcubión Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

 As I climbed, looking toward a village above the rocky coastline near Corcubión.

shore cee Corcubión Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

Cape Finisterre, Cabo Fisterra

 

There it is: looking across the Corcubión Estuary, Ría de Corcubión, to Cabo Fisterra with the town of Finisterre on the nearside. Let’s take a closer look…

cabo fisterra Camino Finisterre Galicia

 

 

cabo fisterra Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

The colorful rugged coastline with the yellow broom providing contrast with the brilliant blue. I believe there is an isolated beach below.

broom ocean Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

This is another beach, the small Praia de Estorde.

beach rocks praia estorde Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

This beach is Praia da Langosteira and is about 2 kilometers long. If you think it’s quiet on this beach at midday, it’s probably because there is the wealth of beaches in the area. These are the beaches facing east. In an upcoming post I’ll take you to the famous beach, Praia de Rostro, on the west side.

beach praia estorde Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

 

cabo rocks praia estorde Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

 A scenic walk through some parkland.

path praia estorde Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

We’ll finish off this post on this boardwalk that takes you through the sand dunes.

walk dunes Finisterre Camino Galicia

 

I hope you enjoyed this post as we made it to the edge of Finisterre. It was a beautiful day as you can tell, and a really fun and exhilarating walk. On my next post, On and Off The Camino Finisterre in Finisterre, Spain, we’ll visit the town itself Finisterre. Please join me as I take you to closer to the end of the world (not quite there yet).

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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2 responses to On The Camino Finisterre in Spain, Cee to Finisterre

  1. It looks beautiful,Hope your pilgrimage helped you to come to terms with your bereavement.My son has reached this area today,and that is why I am googling Cee.I hope you find your anchor in life ,cherish your memories,
    An Irish Mum

    • Kate, I’m glad you found my post. Thanks for your kind words. Time has passed but I will never forget my Mom. I hope your son had a safe Camino. All the best to you 🙂

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