On the Camino Del Norte in Pasajes de San Juan & Pasajes de San Pedro, Spain

April 28, 2014 — 10 Comments
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After a tough morning on my first day on the Camino del Norte, I was glad to arrive at the crest of the hill just before the villages of Pasajes de San Juan & Pasajes de San Pedro. Walking had been difficult, not only from the rain, but because I was so out of shape. The two ascents to begin the day nearly wore me out. I was happy to see the brilliant blue of the ocean and anticipated visiting the picturesque seaside villages.

I left my last post On the Camino Del Norte in Spain, Guadalupe to Pasajes de San Juan, just a little east of this spot, overlooking the city of Pasaia which is a suburb of San Sebastian. Walking through the city is an option but didn’t interest me. I wanted to see the villages, smell and touch the ocean, and was excited when I arrived here, just above Pasajes de San Juan.

 Above Pasajes de San Juan, Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 

Looking out to the Ria de Pasaia. I didn’t know it at the time but I would soon be climbing the hill on the left side of the inlet. First we have to descend steeply to sea level.
Pasajes de San Juan, Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 Looking across to Pasajes de San Pedro.

N3 Pasajes de San Pedro Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain

 

  Part way on the descent, the view toward the sea.

Pasajes de San Juan Ria Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain

 

  Looking back up from where I came from.

Pasajes de San Juan Basque Country Spain Camino del Norte

 

 The walkway or seawall that many people took to a seaside park with steep cliffs that overlook the sea.

Pasajes de San Juan ria Basque Country Spain Camino del Norte

 

However, the Camino followed the opposite way through the village of Pasajes de San Juan (Donibane in Basque).

Basque Region Pasajes de San Juan Camino Del Norte Spain

 

  A closer look with the church on the hill in the center. Let’s continue through the village…

Pasajes de San Juan Basque Camino Del Norte Spain sm w

 

Colorful older homes along the main and only road. It should be noted that the writer Victor Hugo once owned one of these houses.

Street Pasajes de San Juan Basque Region Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 

homes Pasajes de San Juan Basque  Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 As far as I can tell, this is a tribute to the fighters who defeated Charlemagne’s army in the 778 Battle of Roncevaux Pass.

monument Pasajes de San Juan Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 

sign Pasajes de San Pedro Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

For a small fee, there is a ferry that now takes us across the inlet to Pasajes de San Pedro.

harbor Pasajes de San Juan, Basque Region, Camino Del Norte Spain

 

  Looking back at Pasajes de San Juan.

ferry Pasajes de San Juan Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 

boat Pasajes de San Juan Basque Region Camino Del Norte Spain

 

Hard to believe that not long ago, I was on top of that hill.

Pasajes de San Juan, Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

Looking out to the Ria de Pasaia which was more scenic than looking behind to the industrial area.

Pasajes de San Juan harbor Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

 Pasajes de San Juan.

Pasajes de San Juan, Basque church Camino Del Norte Spain

 

Looking back across the inlet. Pasajes de San Pedro is smaller than Pasajes de San Juan so I continued along the seawall, past the boat yard,  until I reached…

seawall Pasajes de San Juan Basque Camino Del Norte Spain

 

this spot. Along this ancient stairwell, I would climb to one of the most scenic stretches along the Camino del Norte.

Steps Pasajes de San Pedro, Basque Country Spain Camino del Norte

On my next post, Coastal Views Along The Camino del Norte in Spain, Pasajes de San Pedro to San Sebastian, I’ll show you that beautiful stretch which I really recommend not missing before the great city of San Sebastian. For planning, if you don’t have time to start in Irún, you can even find your way to Pasajes de San Juan, which is about 10 kilometers from San Sebastian. It may be a bit of a hassle, but if the sun is out, you won’t forget the walk. I would advise though, to keep your breaks to a minimum. If you started in Irún, be careful of your timing into San Sebastian. I walked in the summer and was lucky to get a bed at the albergue in the late afternoon. It can get very busy there with pilgrims who started early from Irún or were starting the Camino del Norte from San Sebastian. I hope you enjoyed this post. Thanks for your time.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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10 responses to On the Camino Del Norte in Pasajes de San Juan & Pasajes de San Pedro, Spain

  1. Gorgeous post mon ami.

  2. I walked the Camino del Norte last July from Avilés – can’t wait to walk it again with you!

    • I remember Avilés well. I had a nice dinner and stay there. My blogging frequency is not good right now but I’ll try and pick it up. Thanks for joining me, Cat 🙂

  3. Great to hear. Will be starting the same route on June 1. Look forward to more of your posts. Safe journey. Peter

    • Peter, I’m sorry to say that I’m blogging very slow but I hope to get another couple of posts published before you leave. Buen Camino 🙂

  4. Randall.
    My wife & I are thinking of doing a family (We have 6 children)Camino Del Norte ,next July. We only have 3 weeks. Can you suggest a good starting point? I have just found your blog & am enjoying it v much.

  5. Leo, it really depends if you want to walk into Santiago de Compostela. Planning the Camino del Norte for a specific number of days is difficult unless you have an idea of the family’s fitness level and the number of kilometers you can walk everyday. If you don’t mind the possibility of skipping parts of the Camino by train or bus, you could even start walking in Irun or San Sebastian and see how everything goes. There are stretches of the Camino that are less exciting, that could be skipped. The latter part of Asturias and much of Galicia is not always as scenic although I really enjoyed Ribadeo. It depends on what you like best and it’s different for everyone.

    Just remember that much of the Camino del Norte is gruelling in terms of climbing and it is not for everyone. If you’re walking in July, it will most likely be hot which will make your days more difficult. You may need to be very flexible, especially with a young family.

    Anyway, I could co on and on, but I hope that helps.
    Thanks for stopping by and Buen Camino 🙂

  6. Randall, my wife and I are planning on undertaking the Camino Del Norte form Irun to Santiago de Compostela next June. We are both fit in our early 50s and have but where thinking as it will be our first Camino are we better to tackle the Camino Frances ? We are travelling from New Zealand have no time restrictions. We are looking into Macs adventure where they offer a 5 stage walk ( mainly to get peace of mind about having accommodation already baggage assistance. Any feedback would be great as its hard to find a lot of information down in this part of the world. Regards Barry

  7. Barry, I’m glad you are going on your first Camino. I think you probably realize that the Camino Frances and del Norte are very different in terms of walking. If you are walking each completely, the del Norte is much more difficult. I believe that everyone should walk the Frances and then decide to walk another Camino later. In this case, if you and your wife can look out and see yourself wanting to walk more than one Camino, I would do the del Norte while you’re younger. As for the tour groups, I don’t know anything about them as I don’t use any when I walk. I’m sure they can make your walk easier but I would find them too constraining. I like the idea and freedom of not know where I’m staying each night. There are some days you will feel great and want to walk far, and on other days, you may want to stop early.
    Anyways, that’s just my opinion. I hope this helps a bit. I wish you and your wife a pleasant journey. Buen Camino 🙂

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