On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Sarria to Barbadelo

April 3, 2013 — 2 Comments
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The Camino followed a gravel and dirt path with small plots of crops among stands of trees. An ancient chestnut tree, similar to the one before Triacastela, had a sign in front asking for it not to be mistreated. I can proudly admit that along the entire Camino, I did not mistreat a tree or any other vegetation. Maybe some blades of grass or a small shrub when I had to take a pee, but I’m sure everything lived. As I climbed, vast farmland emerged as far as I could see. It was the land of dairy farming, and there was a pungent odor to accompany it… From Page 173, Camino De Santiago In 20 Days.

Now, I’ll continue my journey on the Camino de Santiago as I leave Sarria, Galicia. Even if you don’t have my book, you can still enjoy this post, and learn more about walking the French Way or Camino Francés (map from Wikipedia Commons).

I left my last post, On The Camino De Santiago in Sarria, Spain, facing the Convento de la Magdalena, just before descending the hill to this amazing bridge—the 12th century Ponte de Aspera, the rough bridge, which refers to its stone.

Ponte de Aspera Sarria Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago copy

 

 

I enjoyed this spot. It was calming and peaceful with the vegetation and the slow-moving Río Celeiro. I imagined ancient wooden carts loaded with goods from the farms being pushed and pulled along this bridge into Sarria. Although it wasn’t the grandest of bridges, the Ponte de Aspera was one of my favourites.

Ponte de Aspera bridge Sarria Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

After the bridge, the Camino gently climbed through this farmland with patches of trees. The freeway towers to the right.

Path, Sarria Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

 The aforementioned ancient-looking chestnut tree. I think it looks a little spooky.

Chestnut Tree, Sarria Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

 Yes, I respected the tree.

Chestnut Tree sign, Sarria Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

The classic Galician track became steeper, the 109 kilometer bollard is on the right.

Path Bollard, Sarria Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 




 

 

A much younger and more svelte me. Right now, I’m becoming girth challenged and need to walk a Camino very soon.

Randall St. Germain, Barbadelo Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

From the outside, I thought this was a store at Km. 108. Instead, the old house contained a dozen or so vending machines with a variety of food, drinks, and other products.

Rest Stop, Barbadelo Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

The 12th century church, Iglesia de Santiago, in Baradello had a unique construction with the bell tower completely on the left side of the front facade. I’m sorry my photo of the front wasn’t clear, but if you’re there, please take a look around.

Iglesia, Barbadelo Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

Ahhh… a small field of yellow lupines, with scattered white daisies and purple flowers. And may I present…

Field flowers Lupin, Barbadelo Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

white daisies and lupins. This spot was also very pleasing to the eyes and nostrils.

Lupins Daisies, Barbadelo Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

 

The farmland as the Camino gently climbed from Baradello. This is Galicia!

Farmland, Barbadelo Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

I hope you enjoyed this post as I’ll stop overlooking this pretty Galician farmland. On my next post, On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Barbadelo to Morgade, I’ll take you through more lush, green countryside. Please join me.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads page has reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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2 responses to On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Sarria to Barbadelo

  1. Celia Micklefield April 4, 2013 at 11:17 am

    Hi,
    I’ve seen your post on Twitter asking for guest posts on your blog. I’d like to put you in touch with somebody I know.
    Her name is Eva Hamori and she lives in Capestang which is one of the places where pilgrims on the Santiago de Compostella route may stay overnight in free lodgings. (The house with the shell over the door)
    She’s from Vancouver. like yourself, and is in the middle of her great adventure with her husband and children. She’s doing 40 things to do before you’re 40. She also has a fantastic singing voice. Her website is That’s Hamori.com
    She’s on Twitter, too @evahamori
    I’m sure she’d like to hear from you.
    Regards,
    Celia

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