On The Camino de Santiago In Spain, Rabanal del Camino to Foncebadón

November 5, 2012 — Leave a comment
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Across from me, a man in his 30’s tried to impress two women and managed to talk them into walking with him. He even discussed where they would stay that night. One of the women was interested, while the other looked at her friend in disbelief. I ate my fries and almost ordered another before I looked out and saw only sprinkles of rain. By the time I got outside, the rain had stopped, and the skies lightened. It would be a sunny afternoon. Or so I thought… From page 144 of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days. Oh, how I was wrong about the weather!

Now, I’ll continue with my journey on the Camino de Santiago in Rabanal del Camino, Castilla y León. Even if you don’t have my book, you can still enjoy this post, and learn more about walking the French Way or Camino Francés (map from Wikipedia Commons).

I left my last post, On The Camino de Santiago in Spain, Astorga to Rabanal del Camino, on the outskirts of Rabanal del Camino and walked into the village. I believe this small church is the Ermita de San Jose, but could stand corrected. It had been recently rebuilt and sported a brand-new bell gable.

Iglesia de Santa Maria, Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances


Empty streets of Rabanal del Camino in the early afternoon. Residents and many of the pilgrims were hiding, away from the weather.

Quiet streets, Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

I found myself peering through openings such as these, into the past of homes in ruins.

Ruins through the door, Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

Ruins, Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 The 12th century church, Santa María de la Asunción.

The Church, Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

After stopping for the aforementioned break, mostly to escape the weather, I left Rabanal del Camino on this deserted path.

Leaving Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

This memorial for a fallen pilgrim was adjacent to the path.

Pilgrim Memorial, Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

Despite the rain, the conditions of the path in this section weren’t that bad. It was definitely cold, with temperatures just above freezing. I could just imagine how pleasant of a walk this would be on a sunny day.

Path West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 

Path and Stone Walls, West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 There was one steep, rocky climb to reach the highway.

Path Good, West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

Above the highway, the conditions of the path were much worse with mud and large puddles.

Path Bad, West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 A fountain that I’m sure was important to pilgrims in earlier days.

Fountain, West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

Another climb along a rocky trail to the highway and the village of Foncebadón.

Trail West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

Rather dark views of the hills in the surrounding area. This was a far better view than earlier, and that I would have soon after.

Mountains West of Rabanal del Camino, Spain, Camino Frances

 

 I made it! Foncebadón was ahead.

Entering Foncebadón, Spain, Camino Frances

I hope you enjoyed this post. Please understand that I present photos the way it was during my journey. I include photos that others may not, but this is the Camino de Santiago. On my next post, On The Camino de Santiago In Spain, Foncebadón To Manjarín, I will visit the haunting village of Foncebadón and then walk to another one—even more haunting—the village of Manjarín. Please join me.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.




About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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