On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Arzúa to Salceda

May 11, 2013 — 4 Comments
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This began a stretch of about eleven kilometers through hamlets and farmland, up and down shallow river valleys, and through forests of eucalyptus and pine. The afternoon temperature was at least 22°C, and although there was plenty of shade in the forests, I really felt the sun in the open. Each of the short climbs from the streams was a struggle. I didn’t know if the sun was affecting me, but the hamlets looked very similar, and again, I lost track of them… From Page 187, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days. With that said, I will apologize in advance if I have a hamlet or two misnamed in the photos of this post.

Now, I’ll continue my journey on the Camino de Santiago as I left Arzúa, Galicia. Even if you don’t have my book, you can still enjoy this post, and learn more about walking the French Way or Camino Francés (map from Wikipedia Commons).

This may be a little confusing as I will now include photos from both my Camino Francés and my Camino del Norte. If you don’t know, the 860 kilometer Camino del Norte joins the Camino Francés in Arzúa. I’ll still concentrate on my spring Francés and indicate which photos are from my summer del Norte. On my last post, On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Ribadiso to Arzúa, I visited Arzúa in the middle of a warm spring day on my Camino Francés and stayed there the night on my Camino del Norte. These horses and riders rested in the shade just outside Arzúa.

horses Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

The Camino followed this path through forests and…

path Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

alongside farmland. Here, the afternoon sun zapped my energy and I took advantage of the shade from each tree. I would stop and rest at each shaded area before moving on.

track Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Alongside walls of fern and other short shrubs (taken on my del Norte).

Arzua path Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Overlooking one of the communities on the outskirts of Arzúa.

ouskirts Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Back into a eucalyptus forest mixed with deciduous trees.

track path Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

A bit of a rest stop. Pilgrims, please use the garbage bins.

rest path Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

The first café after Arzúa during the much busier August.

cafe Arzua calle Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Made it… at least to the 30 km bollard.

30 bollard Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

A towering forest of eucalyptus. Did you know the eucalyptus is not native to Spain and was brought here from Australia in the mid 1800s? The thought was eucalyptus would be used for building materials which isn’t the case. Instead, the eucalyptus thrived and encroached on other native species such as oak and pine. One thing is for certain, the eucalyptus forests were great for shade on the warmer days.

eucalyptus Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Who is this goofy looking guy?

Randall St Germain Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

forest Arzua Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

I believe this bar is in the hamlet of Calle.

cafe calle Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

homes calle Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Although I often had concerns with dogs on the Camino, these little guys were harmless.

dogs calle calle Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

From my del Norte, this is either in Calle or Salceda.

home calle Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

Another small farming community off the Camino.

farmland Salceda Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

In Salceda, a memorial for a fallen pilgrim.

memorial Salceda Galicia Spain, Camino de Santiago

 

The memorials always made me think. As I wrote in my book, “Nobody came to the Camino expecting to die.”

I hope you enjoyed this post as I’ll stop in Salceda. On my next post, On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Salceda to Arca O Pino, I’ll fight the afternoon heat on my Camino Francés, and after walking the relatively quiet Camino del Norte, be overwhelmed by the number of pilgrims during the summer. Hey cyclists, please slow down! I don’t know how many times I was almost run over. Please join me as I take you closer to Santiago de Compostela.

If you have my book, Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, or have ordered it, I really appreciate your support. It’s also out on Kindle and Kobo. My Goodreads and Amazon pages have reviews and more information. Please share this post, and thanks for your time.

About Randall St. Germain

Randall St. Germain, author of Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, is a middle-aged Canadian Boy who is passionate about nature, photography, hiking, music, and self-improvement. After the death of his mother, he chose to walk the famous pilgrimage, the Camino de Santiago, across the north of Spain, despite knowing little about it. He certainly didn’t plan to write a book until the latter days of his Camino. Similar to walking the Camino, writing and publishing a book was a learning experience. It was also very rewarding, and part of his ongoing journey. Please join him as he takes you along on his journey in Camino de Santiago In 20 Days, and on his blog Camino My Way.

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4 responses to On The Camino De Santiago in Spain, Arzúa to Salceda

  1. Hola! mon ami

    Now, that’s some close-up picture, can’t help but notice that angelic/ with a bit of mischievous look… A wonderful post, beautifully illustrated as always.
    On this Mother’s Day, I will refer to *one* of the most touching part in your book (yes, I said “one” there’s others…) “My Camino The Beginning” You managed to briefly express your feelings in a tangible or creative way ; it must have been difficult for you…and yes, your mother must be proud of you. 🙂

    • Hola 🙂 I really contemplated whether I should include the close-up photo. I don’t really have many of me and thought it was a different type of shot than I usually have. Of course, I took it myself.
      On this day, I thought of my mom a lot. Thanks so much for your kind words. I hope she is proud.

  2. Peter Pfliegel May 14, 2013 at 9:18 pm

    It´s good to see how much shadow is on this last part of Camino. Unfortunately, I´ve heard that hordes of people are on the Camino this year. Allegedly, the race for a bed starts already at the very beginning :-(. I think, I will overnight rather under the free skies :-).

    • Peter, I don’t know if you have seen recent photos from Western Galicia, but it’s very cool and wet. I don’t think anyone is sleeping underneath the stars right now. You still have some time until you walk so I’m sure you’ll be fine. I’ve heard there are a lot of people on the Camino this year.

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